C'est Cool

News & Results

09/21/2005| 0 comments
by Paul Rogen

C'est Cool

There wasn?t an overabundance of drama at the 2005 Tour de France; so here it comes.

was absolutely nobody else around and Peter, good Scotsman that he is with perfect French language skills, let out a good, ? Merde!? He grabbed for his camera in his pocket but Lance was too fast- around the corner and gone in a flash.   Peter kept walking but before he left the roadway here came Lance again.   Peter was still alone and Lance was coming at him quickly, but he dug in his pocket and again succeeded in getting his mini digital camera out just after Lance went by.   The merde was released with even greater force.   Peter mumbled and went on.   Thirty seconds later, Lance was beside him asking in perfect French, if he missed his picture.   Peter of course agreed and Lance offered to rectify things immediately. He tucked in close to Peter, held out Peter?s camera and clicked.   Then Lance flipped the digital camera around and reviewed his work.   The picture looked great and it was Lance?s turn to give the verdict, ?C?est cool,? he said. Peter agreed and wished him well in the race which Lance was about to embark on in less than thirty minutes.   Lance jumped on his bike and was off to slay Ulrich within the hour.    Now, that is the very definition of cool.

 

 

The second story is a few days later at yet another time trial- the Team Time Trial.   The 4 th stage was anticipated as a critical 60 kilometer challenge from what were touted as two very strong teams, CSC and T-Mobile.   Thomson Bike Tours had set up a viewing camp 40 kilometers into the race course.   We were at the brow of a small rise just outside the
village of
Amboise
along the
Loire
River
.  I had pedaled the final 20 k of the race course earlier in the day and experienced the anticipation of the crowd all along the route.   I kept a good pace up and the crowd often let out yells as I came past.   I was toward the end of the allowable time when the course was still open and the picnickers were primed.   I could not return on the route as it was closed so I crossed to the quiet, even abandoned side of the
Loire
River
and circled back to our viewing spot.   This enabled me to thread my way through the throngs on the bridge at Arsanderie and make my way up the surprisingly long incline just before our encampment.   My chums cheered my arrival and then we all waited for the real excitement.

 


 

We kept an informal time tally as the teams went flying by in pure tight formations.   Once in awhile we gave big whoops of encouragement to fallen warriors who had dropped off the back of their own team.   Perhaps they were just not strong enough this day or perhaps they were designed to be used up as spent rocket boosters.

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