Light and Motion Seca 700 Race LED Front Light Review

Reviews & Tech

12/6/2008| 0 comments
by Ron Meisel
Light and Motion Seca 700 Race LED front bike light.
Light and Motion Seca 700 Race LED front bike light.

Light and Motion Seca 700 Race LED Front Light Review

Dynamite comes in small packages. Light & Motion has produced a front light with a powerful punch.

We review the Light and Motion Seca 700 Race LED front bike light.

Dynamite comes in small packages. Light & Motion has produced a front light with a powerful punch. Throw away your lead water bottle battery because the Light and Motion Seca 700 Race LED is a dynamite package.

I wondered how a light as small as this would illuminate. Not only is the light itself small, but the battery is also compact. It is a little larger than two D batteries side by side. The SECA 700 RACE comes in a semi hard clam shell case. It zips open for both felt lined compartments to lay flat. One side has a web net to hold loose items while the other has dividers that are Velcro fastened and can be arranged to form different size compartments. It neatly holds the light, battery, charger, mount, manual and there’s room for more. It is handy to keep everything together and for storage.

To operate the light, push and release the on/off button and high beam is activated. Change to medium beam by tapping the on/off button again. A flashing mode easily catches people’s attention during daylight hours. When the battery is low the beam will flash repeatedly at a timed interval. This warning gave me time to set up my backup light. The light shut off after about ten minutes from the low battery warning. Light & Motion states battery life ranges from 3.5 hours on high beam to 14 hours on low beam. The battery recharges in two hours. I like the safety factor in that the light doesn’t get hot.

There were no surprises that I literally ran into with the beam pattern produced by the Light & Motion SECA 700 RACE. It has intensity and range. The beam pattern didn’t have any fuzzy spots or dark areas. It illumined not only my lane but the entire two lane road and the opposite side ditch. The color of the beam is white rather than yellow.

On my first use, I attached it to my helmet in under a minute. It’s going to take me longer to type my explanation than it took to mount it. No tools are needed. There is a rubber pad on the bottom of the mount that sits atop the helmet. I threaded the Velcro strap through the vent slots on the helmet. This strap is adjustable for different types of helmets. Then, slip the rubber strap that is attached to the light under the cylindrical tube on the mount. Stretch the strap tight and hook it into one of the eight holes to secure it.

Once on the road I adjusted the light horizontally and vertically. It remained secure with no need to readjust. I ran the cable from the light to the battery down the back of my helmet. I made some big loops with zip ties to allow me to pull the cable back through when I unplug it from the battery or change the mounting to the handlebars. That’s the beauty of this

Pages

Your comments
Your comments
sign up or login to post a comment